Buncome Hollow -meaning

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LowlanderDaughter
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Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by LowlanderDaughter » Thu Feb 25, 2010 4:43 pm

I know of an area, too small to be called a town named Buncome Hollow (or spelled Buncombe Hollow). Is this a Scots word or phrase? If it is, what is it in English?

Thank you,
Rhonda

WilmaM
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Re: Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by WilmaM » Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:02 pm

Doesn't sound Scots to me, more English I'd say.

A hollow is a low down part of land not as big as a valley, but not a term I remember seeing in Scotland.
The 'combe' part sounds more Cornish?

Linlithgow,a town in central Scotland, is said to mean "loch in a damp hollow" from llyn (loch), laith (damp) and cau (a hollow).

I'd be interested in other opinions as I can't think of a equivalent term in Scotland

Tracey
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Re: Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by Tracey » Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:06 pm

How do you know of this area to not know if it is in Scotland or of Scottish or Engish origin ? - if that makes sence :?
Scotland - Donaldson / Moggach / Shaw / Geddes / Sim / Gray / Mackie / Richards / Joel / Coull / Mckimmie / Panton / McGregor
Ireland and Scotland - Casey / McDade / Phillips / McCandle / Dinely / Comaskey + various spellings

Tracey
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Re: Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by Tracey » Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:14 pm

Ok ignore the above, i am asuming its somewhere in the U.S and you are just interested in where the name or term comes from :roll: !

Wilma as the only Hollow i know (apart from the odd house that may have stables attatched to it ) is Sleepy Hollow the film but googling i saw this in Scotland http://www.sleepyhollowsmokehouse.com at Loch Ewe - made me hungry !
Scotland - Donaldson / Moggach / Shaw / Geddes / Sim / Gray / Mackie / Richards / Joel / Coull / Mckimmie / Panton / McGregor
Ireland and Scotland - Casey / McDade / Phillips / McCandle / Dinely / Comaskey + various spellings

Liz Turner
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Re: Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by Liz Turner » Thu Feb 25, 2010 9:35 pm

Hi There

There's a reference to a cemetery in Clark County, Washington ...

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wacla ... ncombe.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etna,_Washington

I'd suggest that maybe the "hollow" comes from it being a tiny place with only a smalll population, perhaps in a low-lying area surrounded by higher ground. The "Bunscombe" may relate to the place where the first people to live there came from, or it may be the name of someone??

Here's another link, with yet another idea ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buncombe

There's also a possibility that it is linked to North Carolina.

Sorry this is probably not much help for you!
Fife: Nicolson, Cornfoot, Walker, Gibson, Balsillie, Galt, Elder
NE Scot: Nicolson, Lindsay, Haliburton, Ross
Edin & Central: Nicolson, Blaikie, Stevenson, Ross, Hotchkiss, Suttie, Christie, Clelland, Gray, Purvis, Lang, Dickson
Ross & Cromarty: Ross

LowlanderDaughter
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Re: Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by LowlanderDaughter » Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:36 am

Prior to my dad's sudden death in October 1999 he was doing genealogy research on his grandparents, on his dad's side of the family. They lived in Buncomb Hollow from 1891 to 1904. It is in Clark County in the state of Washington (in the U.S.). It was so small that they didn't have their own post office, and their mailing address would be listed as the town of Etna because they had a post office.

A note my dad wrote in his papers "Bumcombe means 'good' in Scotch?"

From what you are telling me, it must be a different language. I wasn't interested in genealogy until two years ago. I wish I knew where he got that piece of information from.

Thank you for your input.

Rhonda

Tracey
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Re: Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by Tracey » Fri Feb 26, 2010 8:37 am

Normal dictionary definitions of Buncombe
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/buncombe

buncombe [ˈbʌŋkəm]
n
a variant spelling (esp US) of bunkum

Noun 1. buncombe - unacceptable behavior (especially ludicrously false statements)

Says the same really on here http://www.dictionary.net/buncombe
Also on the above link there are some alternatives for Hollow. But nothing about the origin of the words. Maybe some words are just universal and not attributed to one place or language?
Scotland - Donaldson / Moggach / Shaw / Geddes / Sim / Gray / Mackie / Richards / Joel / Coull / Mckimmie / Panton / McGregor
Ireland and Scotland - Casey / McDade / Phillips / McCandle / Dinely / Comaskey + various spellings

Malcolm
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Re: Buncome Hollow -meaning

Post by Malcolm » Mon Mar 01, 2010 2:24 pm

There are lots of place names in England, mostly in the South West, ending in ...Combe. There may not be a connection here but this is also the region from which the early settlers to the new world originated.
In old English, Combe and its variations means a short valley or a hollow in a hillside. There is also an old definition for Bun which means dry stalk. That could leave us with a hollow in a re-entrant where grass grows. Perhaps sort of place where shelter can be found or maybe set up an ambush!
The Scots also have a completely different definition but we could go on forever. Then there’s bunkum mentioned earlier, which is common parlance for nonsense. I had better stop there.
M

Ref :Chambers English Dictionary
Morris (formerly Morrice) of Fife and Geekie of Scone

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